no one line


The Bridge
August 22, 2009, 3:07 pm
Filed under: how-to, tactics

Remember during this year’s Tour de France, when Armstrong jumped away from the dwindling group of B-climbers and bridged up to that yellow jersey group? All across the internet I saw a few eyebrows go up, questioning Armstrong’s move as “chasing down his teammates.” This reminded me of a moment at Union Vale, when I launched an attack, bridged up to another rider, and together we worked very hard to bridge up to a two-man break that had been out of sight. One of those to whom we eventually bridged was a teammate. His companion turned to me and said, “Kissena, why’d you chase your own rider down?” I looked behind me. The peloton was out of sight. “That’s a bridge, not a chase.”

Now, I’m careful not to go overboard with comparisons to pros, because we’re not comparable. Our strengths and abilities are so incomparable that the tactics, though similar, are by no means the same. However: bridging is not chasing. Bridging is bringing another motivated rider to a threatening breakaway, and adding motivation to the breakaway.

Bridging is an important tactic that I don’t see enough of in Cat 4 racing. I see attacks and I see chases. Attacks, of course, force the pace, hit the field a bit, and test the attacker’s ability to gain a lead and hold it. The chase says, “No!” A chase is great if there are primes or points on the line, or if you don’t like the composition of the break, or if your sprinter is the shiznitabam. But if you don’t have a reason for it, chasing tows people who aren’t contributing to the making-things-happen part of the race.

And screw those dudes.

Next time, don’t chase. Bridge. Make everybody work. See what can happen. Chances are good that you’re not one of the four guys in the field who could win in a sprint. Why not try to bridge up and be in a breakaway that sticks? Can we all agree that the best chances that most of us have of winning are in breakaways, and we should all try to make them happen? That we have to make the race hard, that we have to go hard, and that it’s more fun like that anyway?

Please?

And, for God’s sake, if I have just bridged up to you – in a road race, track race, whatever – do not immediately swing off and expect me to “pull through.” That is just ridiculous. Give a fellah a second to recover, okay?

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